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Old Comments:

2008-11-17 08:59:39
The image on the right is pleasant..theoneon the left is not just eerie, it's disturbing...HDR is seldom an improvement..like gaudy make-up and too much flshy jewelry on a beautiful woman..no need , most of the time, to 'pimp out' nature..
2008-11-17 07:43:13
I voted for your photo because you actually had a great description and meaning for your concept on this site.
2008-03-04 07:04:35
Photomatix and photoshop
Unknown
2008-03-01 02:06:06
Korben, the article isn't misleading because it does not claim "However, neither the paper nor the monitor are capable of reproducing the high dynamic range you experienced when 'you were there.'" All it does is explain the gist behind HDR, nothing more. You've gone on to explain a bit more about the process, which would have been fine but no need to attack the original by making up something that isn't being claimed. Hank: I think the "over-saturated" look was intentional to demonstrate a clear difference. As far as HDR photos go, it's nothing special but it uses clearly different elements (sky, grass, shrubs) to contrast the differences.
2008-02-27 21:37:01
an unsubtle tweaker! a good hdr photograph will not make you say "hey... that is hdr." but it can still give you the eerie feeling.
2008-02-27 16:52:39
So why do the colors seem look so over-saturated and phoney-looking? Seriously: is that a problem in the technology, or an unsubtle image tweaker?
2008-02-27 14:44:23
korben, i beg to differ. you CAN produce an image with more stops of light... even ones offering more light than you can see with your eye. what you are thinking about is the fact that HDR is 32bit. your monitor cannot display 32bit images. the paper and ink cannot display 32bit. the human eye is perfectly capable of seeing 32bit. in fact, we can see more colors than that. but the technology cannot. that does not mean it is not there. one day, there may very well be true 32bit monitors and printers, though. tone mapping is indeed an illusion, but that does not create the eerie feeling. the feeling is because we are used to seeing blown highlights and blocked up shadows because cameras (digital and film) can capture only a limited number of stops of light. when an image is displayed more like we remember it, it is eerie because it is not what you are used to.
2008-02-27 02:53:12
Thanks for the explanation. I still love HDR photos. :D
2008-02-27 01:15:22
However, neither the paper nor the monitor are capable of reproducing the high dynamic range you experienced when "you were there". For this reason, the explanation given in the image caption is highly misleading. Regardelss of the technique, it is _not_ _possible_ to reproduce the real-life dynamic range on a monitor or paper. What became known as HDR photography indeed uses multiple exposures to capture more range, but then it uses a process called "tone mapping", which attempts to "squeeze" the captured range into the narrow range of the target media. This is highly creative process which essntially attempts to create _an_ _illusion_ of high dynamic range image on an inherently low dynamic range media. This is done by sacrificing dynamic range of less essential parts of the scene in favor of dynamic range of more important parts. That _illusion_ (not the actual range of the scene) is exactly what you see on your computer monitors. That is the reason why many HDR photographs have that "eerie" feel to them.
2008-02-27 01:15:09
However, neither the paper nor the monitor are capable of reproducing the high dynamic range you experienced when "you were there". For this reason, the explanation given in the image caption is highly misleading. Regardelss of the technique, it is _not_ _possible_ to reproduce the real-life dynamic range on a monitor or paper. What became known as HDR photography indeed uses multiple exposures to capture more range, but then it uses a process called "tone mapping", which attempts to "squeeze" the captured range into the narrow range of the target media. This is highly creative process which essntially attempts to create _an_ _illusion_ of high dynamic range image on an inherently low dynamic range media. This is done by sacrificing dynamic range of less essential parts of the scene in favor of dynamic range of more important parts. That _illusion_ (not the actual range of the scene) is exactly what you see on your computer monitors. That is the reason why many HDR photographs have that "eerie" feel to them.
2008-02-26 22:51:05
Thanks for the tips LM! I like this!