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Old Comments:

2008-03-30 17:38:50
Could be what is called "fata morgana" which occurs when two layers of air of different temperatures meet. The basic, or inferior mirage of the sort we see in summer on the roads, arises when the cold air above begins to warm as the heat rises from the hot road surface. When these different layers of air meet in the sky, and the boundary is curved, rather than level, the effect not only produces a mirror image, but can also act as a lens to magnify anything that lies many miles beyond the horizon. When this happens and there are several layers of alternating cold and warm air, the images are superimposed one upon the other, creating a multi-layered shimmering vision. The ground air must be cooler than that of the levels above to create a true fata morgana, so this is more commonly seen at sea or around coastal areas. This effect has 'created' cities in the deserts and mountain ranges, phantom ships at sea, and more latterly UFOs.
2008-02-12 08:19:53
simply put: its a mirage
2008-02-11 04:08:35
sympas t'as photo ;) bon boulot !!
2008-02-11 00:40:36
The Alps aren't across the sea from Marseille, moron.
2008-02-10 22:15:48
Beautiful image, either way... : )
2008-02-10 22:14:58
..so its definitely not a bit of the Alps thats seen then.....? Which are far, far nearer.
2008-02-10 20:56:47
Without considering the effect of atmospheric refraction, these mountains are far too distant to be observed from Marseille. However, on occasion, atmospheric conditions permit objects typically too far away to be easily observed to come into clear view. On this evening, summits in the Pyrenees Mountains higher than about 2,300 m (7,546 ft) can be detected. Most of the distance between Marseille and the Pyrenees Range is over the Mediterranean Sea. When the water is colder than the layers of air above it, a ray of light traveling through the lower atmosphere will be bent or refracted downward -- the image of a distant object is thus displaced upward (superior mirage).